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Community Initiative for Enhanced Peace and Development (CIEPD)

Deeve which is a short form of developmental levy or matching ground as it is also called, settlement, “illegal” levy which is being forced on a developer most times by the youth of the community. This is common in Niger Delta Region.  This has been alluded to scaring off investors and stalling so many infrastructural developments in the region. It has also contributed in triggering community conflicts as the process of demanding is always forceful.

 On 2nd of November 2016, the conflict watch centre received a report from Nanakumo Ebikeseiye from Tungbo community in Bayelsa state, thanking CIEPD for building his capacity to intervene and resolved potential conflict in their community.

Tungbo is one of CIEPD intervention communities in the Bayelsa Conflict Prevention and Peace Building Project in Sagbama Local Government Area with the aim of supporting and strengthening existing community structures to identify (early warning signals) and respond to conflict. It is supported by NSRP under output one.

“Matching Ground Collector”

cwc impact story1In his word “they were there to collect their right and for them to settle us, and other bodies in the community.” He explained that they (group of youths) approach the dredgers at the river side and asked if they have settled the community which they said no but claim that the work belong to a community member who brought them in to dredge sand.

 

 

 

Mediator “Participated in CIEPD Trainings  Member Coping Mechanism

cwc impact story2On the day when the youth protested, i was outside my house when i saw crowds of youths shouting from the river side “you must settle us today”. I was able to peacefully intervened using the skills acquired during CIEPD conflict training. Eye witnesscwc impact story3

“We thank God that it went in a peaceful way because the people that brought them were claiming right and the community youth were very angry”- Edoki Blessing

 

  

 

Hear the story

See below the sand dredgers fulfilling their own part of pumping sand for Tungbo community, Bayelsa State on Sunday 13th November 2016.

 cwc impact story4

The Story

Adagbabiri community is located in Bayelsa State, an Ijaw ethnicity and predominantly fishing and farming community. The women of Adagbabiri have been part of the Mother for Peace under the Tungbo cluster, which was inaugurated on 31st of October 2016. After the training and inauguration of the mother for Peace cluster, Mrs. Doris

cwc impact story5Adabaebi, the chairlady of Adagbabiri community was so bothered about the way women have been economically disfranchised by the re-allocation of community women resources from them forcefully. They have made several unsuccessful efforts to reclaim these resources.

At the inauguration of Mother of Peace Tungbo cluster on 31st of October 2016 she presented the case with the title “Refusal to give ownership of the lake and Ogbono tree to women in Adagbabiri community”.

According to her, “the women have been in charge and have been making use of the 8 lakes for fishing and renting out when necessary, but the problem started in 2012 when the then CDC chairman, Chief Charles Awele, seized the lakes from the community women without compensation”.

cwc impact story6Mrs. Alaere Katere, a community woman and also member Mother for Peace, Adagbabiri said when she joined the Mother for Peace, they were taught a lot of things, especially on peace and conflict prevention, issues were being discussed as it affects and concerns women in the communities. According to her “We presented our lake problem to the mother for peace when we went to meeting, told them how the men collected our lake from us”

Mrs. Alaere Katere, member Mother for Peace Adagbabiri

During the meeting which was held in Tungbo community, Doris and her fellow women from her community presented the case to the Mother for Peace Tungbocwc impact story7 Cluster. As it is the pattern, each case is given adequate attention, discussed, analyzed and proposed resolution actions adopted for implementation.

Both Mrs Doris Andaebi and Mrs Akatere affirmed that the meeting and training gotten from the Mother for Peace has really impacted on their lives and community on how conflict cases should be handled without any form of conflict escalation that will cause unrest in the community. They said the training and advice gotten from Mother for Peace Tungbo cluster has greatly helped to improve their level of interaction within the community, using negotiation and advocacy to achieve their objective.

Mrs. Doris Adabaebi, the chairlady

of Adagbabiri Community


cwc impact story8They applauded Nigeria Stability and Reconciliation Project (NSRP) and Community Initiative for Enhanced Peace and Development (CIEPD) for creating the Mother for Peace, which they say has helped them not only the re-claiming of their community resources but in reduction of violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) in our communities. They further reiterated that the peaceful resolution of this case was as a result of the conflict management skills acquired by the women during trainings and also lessons they are learning from cross boarder initiatives platform (M4P)

 Christiana Anthony; Bolu= Orua Chairlady

 cwc impact story9

Lakes of Adagbabiri Community, Sagbama LGA, Bayelsa State, Nilakes

A traditional injunction was placed on a contractor who was to build a borehole for the community by the chiefs son, this forestall the project for some months until the intervention of WASH consultant- 

“Before now once there is conflict of that nature, because of fear of unknown especially the ones that involve the youth so the conflict training helped built my confidence to first intervene, then secondly in meeting the parties to the conflict normally we would have called everyone together which would have ended up as   rowdy gathering that can even trigger more anger that might end up to more conflict. The approach used was first to map out the parties to the conflicts, and met them separately, that approach yielded a peaceful result for Conflict sensitivity helped a great deal, it has broaden our knowledge, added to skill of managing” UNICEF WASH Consultant Obot -Akara.

Koluma 1 is a community located in the oceanic riverine community in Southern Ijaw Local Government Area of Bayelsa State. The people are Ijaw of the speaking ethic group and are predominantly into fishing and trading to boost their standard of living and support their families. The community is also an oil and gas producing community, host to Chevron/NNPC joint venture and also member of the GMOU operated by Keffes Rural Development Foundation (KRDF).  The community has different structures in place such as the council of chief comprising of elders, and a community of Royal Highnesses, others are, Community Development Committee (CDC), Woman Association and Youth group association. With the introduction of the Sustainability and Conflict Prevention Project in Bayelsa 

State, and the building of the capacity of selected community participants on conflict transformation methodologies and early warning, the project was set to take off in earnest. But to make participation representational, a total of 10 community persons drawn from the 5 ruling houses in Koluama 1, representatives of the Community Development Committee (CDC), Women, Youths, and the Chief were trained on understanding the intricacies of conflict management, conflict resolution and conflict transformation, conflict prevention, Conflict Sensitivity and Peace building, action planning and steps towards achievement of intervention impact.

Success Story Title:

Conflict arising from Electricity Supply to the community

The Story

In 2010, Chevron donated an electricity generating plant to Koluama 1 Community as part of their corporate social responsibility programmes. According to Mr Raphael Golubo, a budding artist based in the community, “when we use to have light, the community was so nice to stay. You don’t even want to travel out, but now the place is very dull, nothing to enjoy in the community and the cost of fuel is so high”

 

For the past 5 months, Koluam 1 community has not had light from the community generating plant. This was attributed to the inability of community light committee to provide Diesel to power the plant. This has brought untold hardship to the small businesses that use to depend on the community light to make a living. Because of the location of the community, the absence of light meant that community business men had to depend on personal generating sets to carry out any business. This has seriously affected business live in the community. The situation was gradually causing some accusations and stirring up potentials conflict issues in the community.  

  • There are insinuations within the community that KEFFES, the Development Agency set up to carry out development activities has been misusing the funds budgeted to buy diesel for generating light.
  • There have also been some counter accusations about some individuals ‘capturing’ the benefits due the community. For some months, the tension was palpable and could have exploded into a community conflict. 
  • And also open confrontation accusing the community light committee of embezzlement  of funds meant for the fuelling and maintenance of the community generation

However, after the training and inauguration of the Community coping Mechanism (CCM) held on the 25th of January 2019, and facilitated by Community Initiative for Enhanced Peace and Development (CIEPD), funded by Foundation for Partnership Initiative in the Niger Delta (PIND), the CCM identified several conflict situations in the community. After ranking such conflict incidences, the group decided to work on three core community conflict issues. They were;

  • Leadership tussle in the Koluama 1 Youth Association
  • Open conflict between a Cult Group and the Community Youths
  • Conflict arising from Electricity Supply to the community.

 To this end, the group identified “The lack of Electricity Supply in the community” as problem that requires an urgent attention.

Intervention

In order to take action, the CCM after the training visited and engaged some of the community stakeholders that can influence action and intervention and ensure that the community generator is functional and electricity is restored to the community. The group engaged the following;

1. The CDC chairman

2. Community light committee members

3. Oil and gas chairman

Findings during Engagement

During the process of engagement with some community stakeholders, the group inquired to know especially from the community light committee members, the main cause of the absence of light experienced in the community, it was revealed that;

  • The cost of diesel has gone up
  • Lack of frequent availability of diesel
  • Fund received to purchase diesel to power the generator is not sufficient due to high cost and scarcity of the product in the LGA.

The group went further to engaged the Chairman of the CDC who promised to look into the issue and take action. After the meeting with the community light committee, members promised to improve on the supply of diesel so that every members of the community can benefit. Within the same period, March and April 2019, the CCM engaged the oil and gas chairman on how to improve the light situation in the community especially in the area of prompt supply. Other consultations were carried out by the group and after constant reminders and engagement, the issue was resolved and the community has been enjoying light since then. Consultations are still on going to ensure the supply of light is sustained during the coming weeks.

The last time CIEPD team was in the community during the engagement and mentoring session with the Kokuama 1 Community Coping Mechanism, it observed that electricity has been restored and the community was enjoying the light from 6pm to 6am each day.

Testimony by the Chairman of Kokuama 1 Community Development Committee (CDC) and Some Community Members

On our way to the first mentoring session in Koluama 1, the CIEPD project team met with the chairman of the CDC, Chief Alapu Okpulu who had come to see the team off to the community, he said, “… you guys are doing a good job, within the short time you have been here, the boys are doing so much to resolve the conflict issues in the community. “… they call every time seeking for advice or permission to do one thing or the other.  “Thank you very much, you have our support”

 Mr RobertsonSocial life and business are beginning to return to the community and there are attempts to reconcile those who had issues due to the absence of light. While Mr Robertson Michael has gone back to his indomie and fast food business and can cool his drinks for his costumers

 

 

 

Ms WokenighentimeMs Wokenighentime James said, “now I don’t have to travel to Yenagoa before I can make my hair” So far, most community people are happy that light has returned to the community.

 

 

 

 

Picture of the Koluama 1 Community Generators

Koluama 1 Community Generators

Kokuama 1 Generator House

Koluama2    Koluama3

 

Koluama4

View of Power on of one of the generator in two Kokuama 1

Kala Dokubo Community

Kala Dokubo CommunityI give thanks to God Almighty for given us today to see like this, if not his power or the will of God such we won’t be here one way or the other deviated on an unknown destination so for that I give thanks to God on behalf of the community. Secondly I also thank the NGO that did this job for quite some time I have been seeing water project of different kinds especially the treatment 

plant, what we have been seeing is GP tank, clavel and other things but with this project, It has opened my eyes and some people to see that this is another pattern of water treatment that is well approved and usable in time for only this also its an added advantage to our life so we thank the NGO, the partnership all those that partner with the NGOs that did this , for given us a safe water. On behalf of the chief, the community and all that, I stand here to say thank you  as you did , not just only this continue to not because we have   seen this project let the NGO continue to be doing more and more even we still have other places that need water because water is life. Its only when you don’t know the value of water, you don’t know what you say, but when you know the value of water with only water somebody can be sustained so we thank you for bringing this thing for us, for bringing this thing down to our community, so on behalf of the chief and the entire community we welcome you and we say thank you and God bless you for bringing such a project to this place.

 

Obonoma Community

1.Obonoma Community I tell una thank you for this water wey una do especially me, this my condition na really need water and to come dey go far go dey fetch water, the thing dey worry me but as they do the water for my window corner, I wan tell una thank you because the thing do short my leg to dey go far. Una thank you for the water una give us.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kala Dokubo Community222. Especially we wey dey do periwinkle for this Obonoma, they know say we wey dey do periwinkle you know how water dey be with us. We go fetch, we go soak ,after soaking,  roasting, we go soak am again, second time after bringing it out we go put am for water again but because of this solar water wey them give us, everything just dey si ri wa re re give us . We no get wahala, if you dey fetch now. So I tell una a big thank you on behalf of all the periwinkle sellers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Young Jack CommunityYoung Jack Community

S.K.Y Jack, Odiegwu , na him be my name na me be director , so the thing I wan talk, una thank you well well for this borehole wey una come do for us. The first one wey them do no good you sef you talk am, but this one wey una do dey good then una come support em chemical wey go wash the dirty comot now the water if you dey use am baf like say na rain water. If you drink am, e come be like say na this water when I dey small they dey suuply us like swam water, for here for Abonoma here they dey give us one water, them they call am swam water. If you drink that water e dey  like say na they bring am from overseas come na so now this water don dey but we still dey fear because we never hear from una mouth sey the water don dey clean. So now we don hear am Je Je Je for una mouth sey the water don clean, sey this water na better water so now my people they don come plenty now we go dey fetch am like say tomorrow no dey. Everybody  one bucket  one water, one bucket one water.

 

 

 

Samuel and Walter CommunitiesSamuel and Walter Communities

I wasn’t given time to write a remark, if I was given time I would have written a Voluminous remark in response to the project. We the Samuel community we are happy in respect to the project because we have suffered a lot several years ago. We have not seen a project like this before since our forefathers. We are happy that an NGO (Non–governmental 

organization) not even federal government, local government or state government to remember us, to give us a project like this. Even people from other communities, come here to fetch water, the inflow of people coming into the community has made it difficult to contain us any longer in respect to the water. So we thank the NGO for liberating us.

 

BACKGROUND  

Nigeria, like the rest of African counties is a developing country that are particularly vulnerable to climate change, due mainly to its high dependency on natural resources and rain-fed agriculture as well as to its relatively limited technological and economic capacities. Ironically, several factors have placed Nigeria in a position of a contributor to global emission of CO2. For example, Nigeria as an oil producing country flares about 1.2billion cubic feet (bcf/d) of gas a day. This amount of gas flare represents 12.5% of all globally flared gas, which is 68% of the associated gas produced or 51% of the total gas production. According to the African Energy Outlook for 2014, as at 2012, Nigeria flared about 17bcm on the average, slightly more than its annual consumption. However, gas flaring in other West African producing countries has remained around 12bcm per year.

Nigeria’s per capita CO2 Emission is estimated to be about 0.14 Metric tons by 2010.While developed countries like China and US are seen as industrialized nation with highest global emission, Nigeria doubles as a voracious consumer country that contributes to global emission from gas flaring, numerous automobiles, private jets ownership, manufacturing and agro allied industries. Nigeria’s population of about 170 million puts her in a position that her carbon foot print is significantly huge when compared to industrialized less dense populated countries in Europe. Therefore, it will be difficult to exonerate Nigeria from global CO2 emission due to her huge sources of carbon foot print.

From experiences, it is indicative that the proactiveness needed to fight climate change is not there. While the bulk of the rural settlements in Nigeria who make up the agrarian population are more vulnerable but lack basic information about Climate change, the urban settlement are not free from temperature variations that affect their socio-economic activities. Also, women’s traditional roles, including subsistence farming and water collection which means they are most dependent on livelihoods and resources that are put most at risk by climate change.

However, Nigeria’s situation in the face of changing climate is precarious. The threat of climate change to the socio-economic activities in Nigeria is grave and must be intervened upon with immediate effect. For example, the effect of Climate change to Agriculture which is considered as the most weather-dependent of all human activities since climate is the primary determinant for agricultural productivity. Nigeria is under obligation to use the maximum of available resources for the progressive commitment of CO2 reduction. This obligation is encapsulated in national and international standards.

Secondly, most of us now realize we are addicted to fossil fuels that create vast quantities of carbon dioxide and that this addiction also extends to a wide variety of industrial and agricultural practices that create a whole host of other global warming gases.

The United Nation Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) set October 1, 2015 as the deadline for 195 member countries to make pledges to commit to setting out their roadmap to limit the effects of global warming to less than 2°C by 2100. The convention has published 146 countries that have committed to reducing their greenhouse gas emissions. Regrettably, Nigeria is missing from the list. This clearly shows the less commitments Nigeria is willing to sacrifice towards solving the climate crises.

The threat of climate change has never been more urgent. But the way forward has never been clearer. With citizens worldwide united in demanding action and clean energy solutions in our hands, a safe and sustainable future for the planet is finally in sight and the first step is a global agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in Paris.

It is evident that awareness to adaptation is pivotal in the fight against Climate change and this is not at par with the rising consequences which the citizens and the policy makers would not undermine. This Justification give Rise to the Organizing of the Competition to identify science innovation that will contribute to addressing the challenges of Climate Change and education Gap among Girls in Science and Engineering in the Secondary School s in Abia State. Click here to read the full report.

Introduction and Background

Cross River State is in the South South Geopolitical zone of Nigeria. Its capital is Calabar. Its name is derived from River Oyono which passes through the State. English, French, Efik, Bekwarra and Ejagham are languages spoken in the State. Cross River state borders Cameroun in the East.

The first secondary school in Nigeria was established in Calabar the State capital in 1846 and it is called Duke Town Secondary School. Tertiary education in institutions in the State include University of Calabar, Cross River State University of Technology, Arthur Jarvis University, and College of Education in Akamkpa and Federal College of Education in Obudu. Cross River was in the fore of Science Innovations in Secondary School Science projects following the seriousness attached to the Junior Engineers and Technical in Schools – (JETS) Club until 12 years ago in 2007 when these clubs stopped functioning across schools due to loss of interest and lack of funding support.

The United Nations (UN) recognizes that the full participation of women and girls in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) is integral to achieving gender equality. According to UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization), globally, women are underrepresented in the field of research and experimental development, which includes STEM fields. Women represent, on average, 29% of the world’s researchers and 35% of global higher education enrollment in STEM fields.

UNESCO suggest that women’s participation in STEM is crucial to achieving not only gender equality, but also “should be considered as crucial means to promote scientific and technological excellence.” The Girls in Engineering, Mathematics and Science (GEMS) Competition is focused on solving problems using scientific principles and theories. All activities are hands-on and incorporate teamwork, innovation and problem solving. The one-day event provided an opportunity for female science students to showcase their understanding of science and mathematics by using it to solve real life problems. There is a recognized shortage of scientific and technical female experts in Nigeria most especially from the Niger Delta. This shortage has affected our ability to come up with scientific and technical breakthroughs in industry. To increase the number of females entering into the science and technical fields, GEMS was created. 

With more women from the Niger Delta engaged in engineering, mathematics and science, the Niger Delta will have already workforce for the oil and related companies. Empowering young girls and encouraging them to take up careers in engineering, mathematics, and science will enable them to be active participants in the development of the Nigeria Delta. It is believed that increased scientific familiarity may encourage girls to consider careers in science, engineering and mathematics and will also help develop better informed scientific citizens. When girls/women get encouraged and empowered, the whole society benefits. We believe that the more girls take up careers in engineering, mathematics and science and use the principles to solve problems, the more they will impact the Niger Delta and make it better. Click here to read the full report.

  • Introduction and Background

The United Nations (UN) recognizes that the full participation of women and girls in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) is integral to achieving gender equality. According to UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization), globally, women are underrepresented in the field of research and experimental development, which includes STEM fields. Women represent, on average, 29% of the world’s researchers and 35% of global higher education enrollment in STEM fields.

UNESCO suggest that women’s participation in STEM is crucial to achieving not only gender equality, but also “should be considered as crucial means to promote scientific and technological excellence.” The Girls in Engineering, Mathematics and Science (GEMS) Competition is focused on solving problems using scientific principles and theories. All activities are hands-on and incorporate teamwork, innovation and problem solving. The one-day event provided an opportunity for female science students to showcase their understanding of science and mathematics by using it to solve real life problems.

There is a recognized shortage of scientific and technical female experts in Nigeria most especially from the Niger Delta. This shortage has affected our ability to come up with scientific and technical breakthroughs in industry. To increase the number of females entering into the science and technical fields, GEMS was created. 

With more women from the Niger Delta engaged in engineering, mathematics and science, the Niger Delta will have already workforce for the oil and related companies. Empowering young girls and encouraging them to take up careers in engineering, mathematics, and science will enable them to be active participants in the development of the Nigeria Delta. It is believed that increased scientific familiarity may encourage girls to consider careers in science, engineering and mathematics and will also help develop better informed scientific citizens. When girls/women get encouraged and empowered, the whole society benefits. We believe that the more girls take up careers in engineering, mathematics and science and use the principles to solve problems, the more they will impact the Niger Delta and make it better. The economy of the region will not remain the same as those girls/women will certainly take up problems of the region, solve it and build a business around it.

Against this backdrop, Better Life for Rural People, a nongovernmental organization in the bid to bridging the gap mentioned earlier organized a science competition for girls in secondary school in the three Senatorial Districts of Bayelsa State with support from Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC). The event was held at Bayelsa State Ministry of Education, Yenagoa

  • Objective of the competition
  • Main objective
  • Promote women participation in science

 

  • Specific objective
  • Create a platform for girls in secondary schools to show case technological innovations.
  • To create a Platform for Female Science Students to apply science principles and Theories to solve problems;
  • To facilitate learning and excitement about science and mathematics;
  • To inspire female science students to continue to use science principles to solve everyday problems; and
  • To encourage secondary school management teams to take science, technology, engineering and mathematics serious especially in girls’ only institutions in Bayelsa State.
  • Mobilization and engagement of schools to participate

A huge mobilization and engagement strategy was carried out to all the identified schools in all the eight local government areas in the three senatorial districts of Bayelsa State. The processes are discussed in details below;

  1. There was initial visits to twelve schools to discuss the details of the program and secure their participation in the competition. A date was fixed and organized for mini competition in addition to the visit to the various schools laboratories (as shown in the pictures below).  The following were the highlights of the mobilization and engagement process;
  • Introduced the NDDC’s program to encourage girls in technology by organizing a competition for girls in secondary schools
  • Inquired of the existences of Girls in Engineering, Mathematics & Sciences, GEMS clubs in Bayelsa State.
  • Seek for approval/permission of Ministry of education to visit secondary schools in Bayelsa State to invite them to participate in the GEMS competition.
  • Seek for their support and partnership on the program
  • Obtained the list secondary schools in Bayelsa State from the Ministry of Education (Bayelsa has 380 secondary schools) in Bayelsa State
  • Carefully analysed the list and select schools taking into consideration Geographical spread (3 Senatorial Districts) Bayelsa West, Bayelsa Central and Bayelsa East). Preference was given to girls’ secondary schools.
  • Selected 12 schools from the 3 senatorial Districts for mobilization (6 from each Senatorial Districts)
  • Wrote letters to schools to introduce the program and invite them to participate in the competition
  1. A mini competition was organized between schools in the senatorial district. However, inter senatorial district competitions could not hold properly because most of the schools visited declined to participate. Secondary Schools in Bayelsa State had not been involved in science exhibitions competitions before. Schools were hesitant to participate.
  2. Six (6) schools eventually emerged from the three (3) senatorial districts. The six schools represented 5 LGAs and the 3 Senatorial Districts. They include;
  • Model Secondary School, Sagbama, (Sagbama LGA- Bayelsa West Senatorial District)
  • Government Girls Secondary School, Kaiama- (Kolokuma/Opokuma LGA-Bayelsa Central Senatorial District)
  • Government Secondary School, Amasoma (Southern Ijaw LGA- Bayelsa Central Senatorial District)
  • Jude’s Model Girls Secondary School, Onopa, Yenagoa (Yenagoa LGA-Bayelsa Central Senatorial District
  • Community Secondary School, Otuokpoti- (Ogbia LGA, Bayelsa East Senatorial District)
  • Community Girls Secondary School Emeyal 2- (Ogbia LGA, Bayelsa East Senatorial District)

Click here to read the full report

  • Preamblenable them to be active participants in the development of the Nigeria Delta. It is believed that increased scientific familiarity may encourage girls to consider careers in science, engineering and mathematics and will also help develop better informed scientific citizens.

Science competition among secondary schools in the country has been a concern for a private enterprise (a company) which has been in the fore front of doing this is in the last one decade. With this competition, girls’ science students have not been a major player in this, there was no customized competition for girls and this has been recognized globally as an issue to be addressed holistically. The United Nations (UN) recognizes that the full participation of women and girls in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) is integral to achieving gender equality. According to UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization), globally, women are underrepresented in the field of research and experimental development, which includes STEM fields. Women represent, on average, 29% of the world’s researchers and 35% of global higher education enrollment in STEM fields.

UNESCO suggest that women’s participation in STEM is crucial to achieving not only gender equality, but also “should be considered as crucial means to promote scientific and technological excellence.” The Girls in Engineering, Mathematics and Science (GEMS) Competition is focused on solving problems using scientific principles and theories. All activities are hands-on and incorporate teamwork, innovation and problem solving. The one-day event provided an opportunity for female science students to showcase their understanding of science and mathematics by using it to solve real life problems.

In the Niger Delta, innovation and competition of this nature is rear especially the one that brings together girls offering sciences in secondary schools under one roof like the one facilitated by Facilitated by Future Builders Women Empowerment Association with support from Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC) is acclaimed to likely be the first of its kind since the creation of Akwa-Ibom State.

With more women from the Niger Delta engaged in engineering, mathematics and science, the Niger Delta will have already workforce for the oil and related companies. Empowering young girls and encouraging them to take up careers in engineering, mathematics, and sciences.

 

  • Objectives of the competition

The specific objectives of the exhibition and competition are thus;

  • To raise awareness on the need to have a platform for girls offering sciences in secondary schools to show case technological innovations.
  • To apply science principles and theories to solve societal problems through a platform for Female Science Students to latch on and do this.
  • To further arouse the interest of girls science students by facilitating  learning and excitement environment about science and mathematics;
  • To inspire female science students to continue to use science principles to solve everyday problems; and
  • To rekindle and encourage secondary school management teams to take science, technology, engineering and mathematics serious especially in girls’ only institutions in Akwa-Ibom State.

 Click here to read the full report.

Introduction

 In Nigeria, like in many other African economies women play significant roles in the socio-cultural and economic development of their societies. The burden placed on them in many cultures is quite enormous. The overwhelming majority of them provide labour that sustains life-growing food, cooking, raising children, caring for the elderly, maintaining a house, hauling water, etc (Onwubiko, 2012). Even in many married homes, housewives do not fare better as they bear the cost of children’s education and health with little or no support from their husbands. In many other settings too,  women continue to play the role of bread-winners and decision makers in the event of the demise of the father or inadequate male presence.

This absence which could be brought about by death sickness or other forms of physical and mental incapacitation have thrust women in the centre stage for the performance of functions far removed from their traditional responsibility of house-keeping (Onwubiko, 2012). These family commitments have compelled almost every housewife or woman to engage in various forms of economic activities that can generate income to meet family welfare and enhanced standard of living. In Nigeria, they are found in the informal sector such as mining, petty trading, hawking of food and in various forms of food crop production, fishing, tailoring, and so forth. Although women are engaged in numerous productive undertakings, the return to their efforts is quite minimal. Majority of them especially those in the traditional sector are unable to meet their needs and fulfill other family responsibilities. According to Okeem (1998), these women work two-thirds of the world’s working hours. Yet, why are they unable to generate enough income? The major characteristics of these women are that they are illiterate. It is therefore presume that they lack the requisite skills and knowledge that would have improved their productive capabilities. This has consigned these families to a perpetual cycle of poverty. 

Given the role of women in the community generally, women education thus appears to have a greater impact on the family welfare at home than that of men (Oxenham, Diallo, Katahoire, Petkova-Nwangi & Sall, 2002).   

Entrepreneurial education has been identified as a very significant factor in unemployment reduction and poverty alleviation (World Bank, 2001; Babalola, 2007).  Entrepreneurial education seeks to provide participants with knowledge, skills and motivation to encourage entrepreneurial success in a variety of settings.  In fact, it provides a wide range of competencies, which include management and organizational skills.  The Nigeria government also acknowledges the utility value of this type of education by putting in place some active labour policies to promote wage employment through subsidized placement, employment assistance and vocational trainings, and even other measure to encourage self-employment, such as training and facilitating access to credit/grants and other business requirement.

There are formal entrepreneurial education programmes turning out thousands of prepared, motivated and connected women entrepreneurs each year.  With entrepreneurs, the firms and national economy are better off for taking time to learn how to do things right.

The point here is that creativity, resourcefulness and enterprise need to be developed through entrepreneurial education.  The modern myths about entrepreneurs include the idea that they assume the risks involved in undertaking a business venture, but that interpretation now appears to be based on a false translation.  They are successful because their passion for an outcome leads them to organize available resources in new and more valuable ways.  In so doing, they are said to efficiently and effectively use the factors of production.  Those factors are now deemed to also include intelligence, knowledge and creativity.  A person who can efficiently manage these factors in pursuit of a real opportunity, to add value in long run, may expand future prospects of larger firms to become successful.

Jalbert (2000) stated that the term entrepreneur applies to someone who creates value by offering a product or service. He observed that Entrepreneurs often have a strong belief about a market opportunity and organise their resources effectively to accomplish an outcome that change existing interactions.  Some observes see them as being willing to accept a high level of personal professional or financial risk to pursue that opportunity, but the emerging evidence indicates that they are more passionate experts than gamblers.

It is in consideration of the importance of entrepreneurial education in human capacity building, reduction of chronic employment and poverty alleviation, that the National Universities Commission (2004) recommended Nigeria Universities to integrate entrepreneurial education as an integral part of the curriculum. Click here to read the full report.

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Confirmed
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Recovered
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